Video Order Form

 

"How Change Happens: Breaking the "Teach as You Were Taught" Cycle in Science and Math" and "Inventing the Future: The K–16 Connection in Science"

 

Order Information

VIDEO NAME:  
ITEM #:  
NUMBER OF COPIES:  
AMOUNT ENCLOSED:  

 

Customer Information

NAME:  
ADDRESS:  
CITY/STATE/ZIP:  
E-MAIL ADDRESS:  
INSTITUTION NAME:  

Prices include public performance rights

Available only in the United States and Canada

This video is also available through www.films.com or calling (800) 257-5126

Mail this form to:

Films for the Humanities and Sciences
PO Box 2053
Princeton, NJ 08543-2053

 

 

How Change Happens: Breaking the "Teach as You Were Taught" Cycle in Science and Math, 2000

Item: BVL29325

Format: VHS (25 minutes, color)

List Price: $129.95

ISBN Number: 0-7365-4183-7

This National Science Foundation program, showcases innovative teaching techniques as performed by science and math professors at Hampshire College, the University of Massachusetts, and Springfield Technical Community College. In seminars and full-blown lectures, these instructors have succeeded in increasing their students’ engagement with the subject matter by applying active learning, cooperative group work, and alternative test-taking techniques. This video is an excellent tool for stimulating discussion among faculty members about course and curriculum reform.

 

 

Inventing the Future: The K–16 Connection in Science, 2001

Item: BVL29501

Format: VHS (33 minutes, color)

List Price: $149.95

ISBN Number: 0-7365-4333-3

In spite of a growing dependence on technology, studies show that as students move through grade levels they become progressively less interested in the sciences. This program illustrates how teachers can use inquiry-based learning, a powerful teaching method, to motivate students to deepen their understanding about the world around them. Students tackle problems and ask questions instead of simply memorizing concepts in the abstract. What makes this video unique is that it shows teachers using this approach in their classes across grade levels, from kindergarten to college.