Faculty science survey; this term

Form Math Faculty Survery, General
YourName mort
Institution umas
Department this is a test run
Date 12/17/99
StemtecHelp that is a good question indeed
YouCollaborate OnceOrTwice1
StudentCollaborate Several2
B%21 SUBMIT
Faculty science survey; this term

Faculty science survey; this term

Form Science Faculty Survey, General
YourName mort
Department phast
Faculty surveys

Faculty surveys

Form Science Faculty Survey, General
YourName mort
Department phast
Faculty surveys

Faculty surveys

Form Science Faculty Survey, General
YourName mort
Date dec
CourseName1 mech
Faculty surveys

Faculty surveys

Form Science Faculty Survey, General
YourName mort
Date dec
CourseName1 mech
Faculty surveys

Faculty surveys

Form Science Faculty Survey, General
YourName mort
Date dec
CourseName1 mech
Faculty surveys

Faculty surveys

FormType

Science Faculty Survey, General

YourName mort
Faculty surveys

Faculty surveys

FormType

Science Faculty Survey, General

YourName mort
OtherCourse1 1223
OtherCourseName1 elelctricity for .....
Faculty surveys

Faculty surveys

Form Science Faculty Survey, General
YourName mort
Department physics and astromomy
CourseName2 intermed mech
Faculty surveys

Faculty surveys

Form Math Faculty Survery, General
YourName mort
CourseName2 thermo
B%21 SUBMIT
Faculty surveys

Faculty surveys

Form Math Faculty Survery, General
YourName mort
Faculty surveys

Faculty surveys

Form Science Faculty Survey, Fall 1999 Course
YourName mort
Institution umass
Department physics and astromomy
CourseNumber 9999
CourseTitle advanced technology for ....
SessionsPerWeek 3
MinutesPerSession 54
LabPartOfCourse No
Faculty surveys

Faculty surveys

Form Math Faculty Survey, General
YourName mort sternheim
Institution umass
Department physics and astromomy
Date 12/17/99
CourseNumber 222
CourseTitle advanced technology for ....
SessionsPerWeek 3
MinutesPerSession 54
LabPartOfCourse Yes
DescribeInformal i am testing the form for math faculty teaching stemtec courses fall 99 output is in stemtec/forms/fac1out.html
Faculty surveys

Faculty surveys

Form Science Faculty Survey, Fall 1999 Course
YourName hrs
Institution UMa
Department phy
Date 12/22/99
CourseNumber ssss
CourseTitle sss
SessionsPerWeek 44
MinutesPerSession 30
LabPartOfCourse Yes
WrittenFeedback
DescribeInformal sssfff
PyramidEXams
Journals
Portfolios
DescribeFormal yada yada
OnTheSpotModifications
IndividualFeedback
DescribeOtherUses more
QualitativeProblems
FillBlanks
OtherExamPerformDescribe somemore
SelectedResponsePerCent 45
ConstructedResponsePerCent 67
FewSentences1
CritiqueExperiment1
OtherFinalDexcribe mmm mmmm
SelectedResponsePerCentFinal kk
ConstructedResponsePerCentFinal 66
WorkInGroups 44
ClassParticipation 44
FinalExam 77
PyramidExams 77
WorkInGroups5 77
WorkInGroups6 77
WorkInGroups7 77
WorkInGroups9 88
WorkInGroups11 55
WorkInGroups12 55
OtherGradingDescrive nnn nnn
Inquiry 2
Assessment 5
DescribePractice POOR
ExplainImprovement JJJJ
DescribeExperiences KKKK
Groups AlmostEvery
Teaching AboutHalf1
TwoWeekProject AboutHalf2
PeerTutoring AboutHalf3
StudentsTeach rarely4
OtherCourses rarely5
NSES Aware
NsesInfluenceContent Some
NsesInfluencePractices Some1
Standards Read2
MassInfluenceContent Some1
MassInfluencePractices Some2
LiteracyOmissions ddddddddd
ReasoningQuatitatively M
CrossDisciplinary L
UnderstandingInquiry M
PracticingInquiry E
ApplyingSciencePrinciples M
ReadScience L
WriteScience M
PhySciBasics M1
PhyBioBasics M1
PhyGeoBasics M1
ReasoningScientifically M1
ReasoningCreatively M1
ReasoningAnalytically M1
UndergradPrep ho hum
TeachingInfo Never
CareerInfo ffffffff
WhyNot vvvvvvvv
StemtecHelp ggggggg
YouCollaborate OnceOrTwice1
StudentCollaborate OnceOrTwice2
Faculty surveys

Faculty surveys

Form Math Faculty Survey, General
YourName q
Department dd
Date d
CourseNumber d
SessionsPerWeek d
MinutesPerSession d
LabPartOfCourse No
QuestionsInLecture
OthersInformal
DescribeInformal lllll
Quizzes
TakeHomeQuiz
DescribeFormal vvv
SyllabusModifications
OtherUses
DescribeOtherUses ccc
Proofs
OtherExamPerformDescribe dddd
SelectedResponsePerCent 44
ConstructedResponsePerCent 44
FewSentences1
ShortEssay1
OtherFinal
OtherFinalDexcribe ffff
SelectedResponsePerCentFinal 33
ConstructedResponsePerCentFinal 34
ClassParticipation 55
FinalExam 55
OtherExams 55
PyramidExams 5
WorkInGroups5 5
WorkInGroups6 7
WorkInGroups7 7
WorkInGroups8 7
WorkInGroups9 7
WorkInGroups10 7
WorkInGroups11 7
WorkInGroups12 7
WorkInGroups13 7
OtherGradingDescrive 7bbbb
Inquiry 3
Assessmnet 3
DescribePractice ggggggg
ExplainImprovement ddddddd
DescribeExperiences hhhhhh
Groups AboutHalf
Teaching AboutHalf1
TwoWeekProject AlmostEvery2
PeerTutoring AlmostEvery3
StudentsTeach AlmostEvery4
OtherCourses Every5
NCTM Aware
NCTMrev Aware1
NctmInfluenceContent Some
NctmInfluencePractices Some1
Standards Read2
MassInfluenceContent Some1
MassInfluencePractices Considerable2
LiteracyOmissions ggggggggggg
ProblemSolving L
Speaking E1
Writing E1
Reasoning E1
Connections E1
Algebra E1
Functions E1
CrossDisciplinary E1
GeometrySynthetic E1
Statistics E1
Probability E1
Trigonometry E1
DiscreteMath E1
Calculus E1
UndergradPrep ddd
TeachingInfo OnceOrTwice
WhyNot mmm
StemtecHelp nnn
YouCollaborate Never1
Faculty surveys

Faculty surveys

Form Science Faculty Survey, Fall 1999 Course
YourName Merle Bruno
Institution Hampshire College
Department Natural Science
Date 12/23/99
CourseNumber NS121
CourseTitle Human Biology
SessionsPerWeek 2
MinutesPerSession 90
LabPartOfCourse No
ObservingGroups
WrittenFeedback
OthersInformal
DescribeInformal numerous short written assignments revisions of some written work peer evaluation forms for group work optional evening help sessions (weekly)
Problems
Papers
Presentations
Journals
Portfolios
LibraryReports
OnTheSpotModifications
SyllabusModifications
ClassFeedback
IndividualFeedback
Misconceptions
TeachingEffectiveness
DescribeOtherUses preparing final written narrative evaluations
ClassParticipation 25
WorkInGroups7 5
WorkInGroups8 30
WorkInGroups9 5
WorkInGroups10 5
WorkInGroups12 5
WorkInGroups14 25
OtherGradingDescrive The breakdown above isn't quite true because we don't give quantitave grades, but it does reflect to some degree the relative weight of different aspects of a student's work that is reflected in the final evaluation. Portfolio looks relatively weaker than istrue because it is redundant to some degree of other things on the list that are part of the portfolio.
Inquiiry 1
Inquiry 2
Assessment 2
DescribePractice [By rating this a 1 I'm takin that to mean what is said: "sufficient" not "perfect."] We organize students into small (4-6) working groups to work on solving problems we present. It is important to structure these so that the work of all students in each group is necessary for the group to function well. The kinds of problems presented include single class medical cases, multiweek medical cases, and 3 class period work on primary research articles.
ExplainImprovement Students learn to take ownership of what they are doing. They learn to ask good questions about content, source material, and the nature of evidence. The have to "test" their own learning by trying to teach things to others. They are more open about asking me questions after they've seen that others in their group have similar questions. They also learn how to find resources to answer their questions.
DescribeExperiences How we've learned to structure groups and solve problems when groups aren't working as hoped. Also I'd share examples of student written work.
Groups AlmostEvery
Teaching rarely1
TwoWeekProject AboutHalf2
PeerTutoring AlmostEvery3
StudentsTeach rarely4
OtherCourses AlmostEvery5
NSES Read
NsesInfluenceContent Some
NsesInfluencePractices Some1
Standards Read1
MassInfluenceContent Some1
MassInfluencePractices Some2
PhySciBasics E
PhyBioBasics E
PhyGeoBasics E
ReasoningScientifically E
ReasoningCreatively E
ReasoningAnalytically E
ReasoningQuatitatively E
CrossDisciplinary E
UnderstandingInquiry E
PracticingInquiry E
ApplyingSciencePrinciples E
ReadScience E
WriteScience E
UndergradPrep Please note that the answers on the chart above seem to have erased answers on the previous chart and vice versa (I can't get both to stay). I think they should start out exactly the same. All of the inquiry skills are important for both. Science grad students will need more depth and detail of advanced courses. Both should have some research experience somewhere in their undergraduate work.
TeachingInfo OnceOrTwice
CareerInfo Telling them about opportunities to work on a Hampshire Day in the Lab or have an 8th grade email partner.
StemtecHelp Maybe some on line info on teaching as a career that we could link to on our course page.
YouCollaborate Several1
StudentCollaborate OnceOrTwice2
Faculty surveys

Faculty surveys

Form Science Faculty Survey, Fall 1999 Course
YourName Merle Bruno
Institution Hampshire College
Department Natural Science
Date 12/23/99
CourseNumber NS240
CourseTitle Elementary School Science Workshop
SessionsPerWeek 2
MinutesPerSession 90
LabPartOfCourse Yes
ObservingGroups
OthersInformal
DescribeInformal collecting journals regularly (time at the end of most class periods to write in journals)
Papers
Presentations
Journals
Portfolios
DescribeFormal Written responses to reading assignments
OnTheSpotModifications
SyllabusModifications
ClassFeedback
IndividualFeedback
Misconceptions
TeachingEffectiveness
WorkInGroups 10
ClassParticipation 20
WorkInGroups8 15
WorkInGroups9 15
WorkInGroups10 10
WorkInGroups11 5
OtherGradingDescrive Students prepared science activities to teach over 6 class periods in local K-12 classrooms. Preparation for this, the actual teaching, and reflections (written and oral) formed a significant portion of their work.
OtherGrading 25
Inquiiry 1
Inquiry 2
Assessment 11
DescribePractice Several forms of assessment were important in this class. Frequent short written assignments included writing about text assignments, reporting on lab activities, proposing projects to teach to our class and to K-12 students, giving feedback to peers, etc. Also a final paper focusing on some aspect of their teaching in light of reading they had done on the Standards or constructivist theories of learning as well as a final; reflection on their own work was central to my final assessment of theur work.
ExplainImprovement Students interested in teaching and interested in science learn more about their own learning as well as that of their students.
DescribeExperiences journals that reflect on what their goals for students were and how they decided if their students achieved them and what they'd do differently next time and why.
Groups AlmostEvery
Teaching AlmostEvery1
TwoWeekProject AboutHalf2
PeerTutoring AboutHalf3
StudentsTeach AboutHalf4
OtherCourses AlmostEvery5
NSES Read
NsesInfluenceContent Some
NsesInfluencePractices Some1
Standards Read1
MassInfluenceContent Some1
MassInfluencePractices Some2
PhySciBasics M1
PhyBioBasics M1
PhyGeoBasics M1
ReasoningScientifically E1
ReasoningCreatively E1
ReasoningAnalytically E1
ReasoningQuatitatively E1
CrossDisciplinary E1
UnderstandingInquiry E1
PracticingInquiry E1
ApplyingSciencePrinciples E1
ReadScience E1
WriteScience E1
UndergradPrep I answered this for NS121 Hampshire College
TeachingInfo Several
CareerInfo Assignments to review teachers guides from curriculum programs funded by NSF Readings on theories of learning in science and of NSTS and the frameworks of states they are from (web sites) requiring students to prepare activities and teach and observe science classes.
StemtecHelp Two of the teachers whose classes students taught in are STEMTEC teachers and they helped find other classrooms as well. Planning ahead with teachers helped, but this wasn't easy to achieve with non STEMTEC teachers.
YouCollaborate Several1
StudentCollaborate Several2
Faculty surveys

Faculty surveys

Form Science Faculty Survey, Fall 1999 Course
YourName Jennifer Normanly
Institution University of Massachusetts
Department Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Date 12/31/99
CourseNumber BIOCHM565
CourseTitle Molecular Genetics Laboratory
SessionsPerWeek 2
MinutesPerSession 240
LabPartOfCourse Yes
ObservingGroups
QuestionsInLecture
DescribeInformal Asking the teaching assistants about the types of questions and comments that they hear from the students Encouraging students to meet with me individually outside of class hours Talking to students individually during class Solicitation of e-mail questions/comments
Quizzes
Problems
LabReports
Grading
SyllabusModifications
ClassFeedback
Misconceptions
TeachingEffectiveness
QuantitativeProblems
QualitativeProblems
FewSentences
OtherExamPerformDescribe Analyze the results from a hypothetical experiment
ConstructedResponsePerCent 100
WorkInGroups 15
OtherExams 35
WorkInGroups11 50
Inquiiry 1
Assessment 11
DescribePractice Incorporate challenging problem solving excercises into course that require students to work in groups.
ExplainImprovement Student groups are likely to formulate an understanding of the material that is more accessable to them than if the instructor simply tells the students what to think.
DescribeExperiences The definite caveat is that a subset of students won't participate fully and hence receive no benefit from the group exercise.
Groups Every
Teaching never1
TwoWeekProject AboutHalf2
PeerTutoring never3
StudentsTeach never4
OtherCourses AboutHalf5
NSES Aware
Standards Read2
PhySciBasics L
PhyBioBasics E
PhyGeoBasics L
ReasoningScientifically M
ReasoningCreatively E
ReasoningAnalytically E
ReasoningQuatitatively E
CrossDisciplinary E
UnderstandingInquiry E
PracticingInquiry M
ApplyingSciencePrinciples E
ReadScience M
WriteScience L
PhySciBasics1 E1
PhyBioBasics1 E1
PhyGeoBasics1 E1
ReasoningScientifically1 E1
ReasoningCreatively1 E1
ReasoningAnalytically1 E1
ReasoningQuatitatively1 E1
CrossDisciplinary1 E1
UnderstandingInquiry1 E1
PracticingInquiry1 E1
ApplyingSciencePrinciples1 E1
ReadScience1 M1
WriteScience1 L1
UndergradPrep No difference
TeachingInfo Never
WhyNot I received information about relevant courses too late in the semester and most of my students are seniors so the scholarship program is not available to them.
YouCollaborate Never1
StudentCollaborate Never2
Faculty surveys

Faculty surveys

Form Math Faculty Survey, General
YourName George Avrunin
Institution UMass
Department Mathematics & Statistics
Date January 5, 2000
CourseNumber Math 113
CourseTitle Math for Elem School Teachers
SessionsPerWeek 3
MinutesPerSession 50
LabPartOfCourse No
ObservingGroups
WrittenFeedback
BehaviorInLecture
Final
Problems
Grading
OnTheSpotModifications
SyllabusModifications
IndividualFeedback
Misconceptions
TeachingEffectiveness
QuantitativeProblems
QualitativeProblems
FewSentences
ShortEssay
OtherExamPerform
OtherExamPerformDescribe Students were asked to explain some mathematical phenomenon, either one previously discussed in class (e.g., why the product of two negative integers is positive) or one presented on the exam (e.g., an algorithm for subtraction that does not require borrowing). For some of these problems, students worked on them individually and then in small groups. I'm not sure where exactly how this fits with "write a few sentences" and "write a short essay".
ConstructedResponsePerCent 100
QuantitativeProblems1
QualitativeProblems1
FewSentences1
ShortEssay1
OtherFinal
OtherFinalDexcribe See response to 4a
ConstructedResponsePerCentFinal 100
WorkInGroups 5
ClassParticipation 10
FinalExam 35
OtherExams 40
PyramidExams 10
WorkInGroups8 20
OtherGradingDescrive My hour exams had some pyramid parts with group work. So the total is more than 100%
Inquiry 4
Assessmnet 3
DescribePractice Group work can vary along several dimensions, including how the groups are formed, the sizes of the groups, whether they are long-lasting or formed only for a single session, whether they meet outside the classroom, how the roles of individuals in the group are determined, etc. The "practice" is complicated enough that "describing it" is a major undertaking, not suitable for a small text box on a form. What exactly is this question supposed to be getting at? Is it a test of whether we really know anything about the practice?
ExplainImprovement Claimed advantages of group work include such things as the benefits of students explaining their ideas, synergistic effects of several individuals working together on a problem, increased interest in the material because of social factors and reduced isolation, etc. (Another claimed benefit of group work is that it teaches students to work productively in groups, and this is what industry wants higher education to do. I have serious doubts about whether that's a reasonable educational objective, but there's no reason to believe that it would improve student achievement in courses, so I won't discuss it further.) As far as I can tell, the evidence for these advantages is fairly weak, especially given how hard it is to separate out factors such as the instructor's interest and motivation. The claims seem plausible and attractive to me, but one of the things science teaches us is that plausible and attractive is not the same as true.
DescribeExperiences My students worked fairly frequently (about once out of every 3 or 4 class sessions) in informal groups. Sometimes students sitting near each other formed a group; other times I used some more or less random method to select group members. Students seemed to enjoy the group activities (although they tended to spend a considerable amount of time on what seemed to me to be social conversation about things unrelated to the class). I think that the main advantage of the group work was that it kept them from saying "I'm stuck" and giving up---in the groups, there were enough people generating ideas and enough social pressure to keep working. For students who missed graded group activities due to illness, etc., I did some one-on-one work, and my impression is that this may have been more effective than the groups, since I could efficiently spot some misconceptions and lead the student to examine them. On the other hand, it wouldn't have been possible to do that with all 30 students regularly, so the group work, with the instructor circulating and making occasional suggestions to group members, seems like a useful approach.
Groups AboutHalf
Teaching AboutHalf1
TwoWeekProject never2
PeerTutoring never3
OtherCourses AboutHalf5
NCTM Read
NCTMrev Aware1
NctmInfluenceContent Considerable
NctmInfluencePractices Some1
Standards Read1
MassInfluenceContent Considerable1
MassInfluencePractices Some2
LiteracyOmissions These are too vague to be of much use. What really is "mathematical connections" or "mathematics as reasoning"? Isn't geometry part of "mathematics as reasoning"? Are "calculus" and "mathematics as problem solving" really the same sort of things? What's missing from this list are things like some facility with calculation, estimation, and the ability to construct and criticize mathematical models/representations. But maybe that comes under "mathematics as problem solving" or "mathematical connections". Since there isn't a place for comments on item L-2 below, which asks about these same "facets", I'll add a comment here. I've read the NCTM standards and a large number of textbooks that are intended to present such things as "mathematics as communication" to future elementary school teachers, and I still couldn't really give a clear definition of "mathematics as communication", let alone say whether it's part of mathematics or part of communication. I am not arguing that being able to communicate mathematical information and ideas isn't important, only that these "facets" are not very well defined or clearly part of mathematics. For instance, my experience is that, aside from graphing, the main problems my students have in communicating mathematical ideas that they understand arise from a general lack of skill in written communication, not from some difficulty with special mathematical communication. So I'm checking the boxes in item L-2 based on what *I* mean by "mathematical connections", etc., not what I believe any reasonable person would mean by those terms (even a reasonable person who had read the NCTM standards, etc.).
ProblemSolving E
Speaking L
Writing M
Reasoning E
Connections E
Algebra E
Functions E
CrossDisciplinary M
GeometrySynthetic M
Statistics E
Probability M
Trigonometry L
DiscreteMath M
Calculus L
ProblemSolvingT E
SpeakingT E
Writingt E
Reasoningt E
Connectionst E
Algebrat E
Functionst E
CrossDisciplinaryt E
GeometrySynthetict E
Statisticst M
ProbabilityT M
TrigonometryT E
DiscreteMathT E
CalculusT E
UndergradPrep I'm not sure what "intending to be mathematicians" means. Does it refer to students who want to become university professors of mathematics, or students who want to get a bachelor's degree in mathematics and work in industry? For the former, I think the main difference would be in the depth of preparation---students who will become professors of mathematics need to cover more material, and to understand both individual topics and the mathematical connections among them, in greater depth than students who will become high-school teachers of mathematics. There are a number of reasons for this, including most importantly the fact that the mathematics the future professors learn as undergraduates serves as the foundation for a (much larger) body of amount mathematics they will learn later. For students who will go on to work in industry, undergraduate preparation should emphasize the kinds of mathematics that the students will be using. These students, for instance, need to learn a lot about differential equations that would probably not be very relevant to teaching high school.
TeachingInfo Several
CareerInfo A first-grade teacher visited my class and discussed the kind of mathematics she needs and the way she teaches. She also brought her class to meet mine, and guided my students in conducting some assessments of her students that she used in her teaching. (These were related to topics on the concept of number, one-to-one correspondence, etc., that we were covering in class at the time.) I also tried to consistently relate the material we were covering to elementary school curricula, and to ask the students how they would respond to particular questions children might raise.
StemtecHelp This class is intended for students who have already indicated an interest in teaching at the elementary level. So they're very aware of teaching as a career. The main difficulty in the class is convincing them that *understanding* some mathematics is an essential part of that.
YouCollaborate Several1
StudentCollaborate OnceOrTwice2
Faculty surveys

Faculty surveys

Form Math Faculty Survey, General
YourName Jim Morrow
Institution Mount Holyoke College
Department Mathematics
Date 2/2/00
CourseNumber1 Math 120
CourseName1 Introductory Seminar in Geometry
year1 Spring 1999
ObservingGroups
WrittenFeedback
QuestionsInLecture
BehaviorInLecture
DescribeInformal Observing the number of students using the course web pages for questioning and commenting
Problems
Papers
Presentations
Journals
Portfolios
Grading
OnTheSpotModifications
ClassFeedback
IndividualFeedback
Misconceptions
TeachingEffectiveness
WorkInGroups 15
ClassParticipation 15
WorkInGroups8 20
WorkInGroups9 20
WorkInGroups12 30For me,
Inquiiry 1
Assessment 11
DescribePractice For me, an inquiry-based course means that a significant portion of the course content has to be driven by questions, problems, and conjectures that are generated by students. This could mean that nothing but the first moments of a class are planned ahead of time. In practice, given that course content often must be constrained prior to teaching the class, much of the content is instructor-determined. In between these two extremes lie an awful lot of territory. What is key to making inquiry a significant amount of the course and an intellectually significant component of the course is to provide a rich variety of stimulation that leads different students to generate different kinds of questions and conjectures. Following the generation of inquiry is the necessity for the instructor to be able to follow up on inquiry with guidance into investigations. Of course, there is a lot more to be said and a lot more qualification to be given, but I will give just one more comment: Having course web pages available for student-student and student-instructor interaction that takes place between classes is a great contributor to making inquiry work. For I can follow up on students class contributions and respond, giving time for the student to investigate prior to the next class period. I don't need to be able to respond in a real-time fashion in class.
ExplainImprovement I believe that when a student knows that her comments in class will be taken seriously enough for the instructor to suggest investigations to that student based on those commments, that increases motivation to treat a class seriously in a dramatic way.
Groups AlmostEvery
Teaching rarely1
TwoWeekProject rarely2
PeerTutoring AboutHalf3
StudentsTeach AboutHalf4
NCTM Read
NCTMrev Aware1
NctmInfluenceContent None
NctmInfluencePractices None1
Standards Read2
ProblemSolving M
Speaking L
Writing M
Reasoning M
Connections E
Algebra L
Functions M
CrossDisciplinary L
GeometrySynthetic M
Statistics M
Probability L
Trigonometry L
DiscreteMath L
Calculus L
ProblemSolvingT M
Speakingt L
Writingt M
Reasoningt M
Connectionst E
Algebrat L
Functionst M
CrossDisciplinaryt L
GeometrySynthetict M
Statisticst M
ProbabilityT L
TrigonometryT L
DiscreteMathT L
CalculusT L
TeachingInfo OnceOrTwice
CareerInfo I start by asking them to write about their experiences in k-12 mathematics. I have them share what they want about such experiences and we have a couple discussions of teaching based on the information (often about feelings and how k-12 mathematics experiences have influenced their lives).
YouCollaborate Never1
StudentCollaborate Never2